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Kano model of customer satisfaction

December 2, 2006 by Artem


According to the Standish group research on average 45% of a software features are never used and only 20% of features are used always or often. It means that on average you could develop two times simpler product and sell it for the same price. Potentially gains can be even bigger, for the enterprise scale systems two times simpler product often means four times shorter schedules and ten times simpler integration and testing.

There is no other way to discover what features would be actually used, than to ask the real or at least potential customers, preferably after letting them to try some features live. One of the tools for aiding the feature categorization is the Kano model of customer satisfaction.

The Kano model separates features into three broad categories:
1. Must-have, mandatory features.
It is necessary to develop these features just to enter the market. However, once the basic requirement is satisfied, customer almost doesn't care about the further improvement of the feature.
For example, the modern web processor has to contains the spell-checker feature to be sell. However, most customers won't even notice if the spell-checker contains 50 or 200 thousands words

2. Linear or performance features
The better this kind of features is developed, the more customer is satisfied.
For example, the more storage space a file storage server provides, the more customers would be satisfied

3. Excitement or "wow" features
Customer won't be disappointed too much if these features are missing. However, the couple of exciter features can provide great customer satisfaction often adding a price premium to a product.
For example, a built-in e-mail client isn't an indispensable feature for a web browser, but it can really excite some people

Must-have features are required for a product to enter the market and therefore have to be developed as soon as possible. After must-have features are implemented, as many linear features as possible should be implemented, because each of these features increases the customer satisfaction (unless there are already too many of those). Exciter features are to be approached the last, but keep in mind that a couple of exciters can contribute very well to the viral marketing of a product.

What kind of categorization do you use for your products? How often do you re-prioritize your feature list?

Feature Categorization and Customer Satisfaction series:

Comments

hey

April 25, 2008 by Software Development (not verified), 6 years 17 weeks ago
Comment id: 1524

hey,

I liked this part:
3. Excitement or "wow" features
Customer won't be disappointed too much if these features are missing. However, the couple of exciter features can provide great customer satisfaction often adding a price premium to a product.
For example, a built-in e-mail client isn't an indispensable feature for a web browser, but it can really excite some people
Regards!

Agree with you, what the

August 8, 2008 by Rajagopal Yendluri (not verified), 6 years 2 weeks ago
Comment id: 1749

Agree with you, what the least potential customer will always look for " Must-have, mandatory features." and "Linear or performance features", but i (assuming i am an end customer) like to have "Excitement or "wow" features", but for free of cost :), usually i never use this feature or oftenly use this feature... so why an end customer pay's for this?

Any Comments !!!!

Regards,
Rajagopal Yendluri(Raj)

Well, customers would like

August 9, 2008 by Artem, 6 years 2 weeks ago
Comment id: 1752

Well, customers would like to have everything for free, wouldn't they? ;) I find that customers tend to appreciate exciter features just as they appreciate, for example, free WiFi in the hotel. Certainly the amount of exciters is better to be kept under control so that mandatory features would also have chance to be implemented. Other than that pricing is pricing, if you order an opportunity to build something nice, you ask customer to pay for it.

Twisted meaning

October 17, 2008 by DJ (not verified), 5 years 45 weeks ago
Comment id: 1914

Excitement factors aren't supposed to be useless Gizmos. They are solutions to needs that advance a products competitive edge. Granted there should be a lot fewer of these than required features but when they exist they should be top priority because they are by definition what satisfies the customer and/or market need.

One example is the iPod jog wheel. The iPod _required_ a navigation method. The design team came up with an exciting and innovative way which differentiated the iPod from other products.

The reason for the statistic above has more to do with miss-identfying needs. It takes a skilled team to turn "i need" into "I want" or better yet, "I can do without".

Collaborating with customer expectations is an entirely differnt endeavor. Let me last point out that any project that's considered agile should go beyond simple numbered priorities and use stack-ranking based on priority, cost, architectural significance, etc...

Kano model helps forming the priorities

October 17, 2008 by Artem, 5 years 45 weeks ago
Comment id: 1915

I agree, it is certainly quite useless to develop useless features :)
Stack-ranking based on priority is useful for the teams, Kano models are just one of the tools that helps building such priorities and especially figuring out the product idea before any development is started.

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